Narrative essay on aging

Participants were recruited from retirement communities, a low-income senior housing complex, and a continued learning center in San Diego County. Two primary themes were identified as key to successful aging - i.

Narrative essay on aging

He lost both his parents within his first few years of his life and was raised with his sister Alice by his paternal grandparents, both of whom were devout Protestants.

Ricoeur was a bookish child and successful student. He was awarded a scholarship to study at the Sorbonne inand afterwards was appointed to his first teaching position at Colmar, Alsace.

While at the Sorbonne he first met Gabriel Marcel, who was to become a lifelong friend and philosophical influence. In he was married to Simone Lejas, with whom he has raised five children. He was interred with Mikel Dufrenne, with whom he later wrote a book on the work of Karl Jaspers. Ricoeur is a traditional philosopher in the sense that his work is highly systematic and steeped in the classics of Western philosophy.

His is a reflective philosophy, that is, one that considers the most fundamental philosophical problems to concern self-understanding.

Narrative essay on aging

While Ricoeur retains subjectivity at the heart of philosophy, his is no abstract Cartesian-style subject; the subject is always a situated subject, an embodied being anchored in a named and dated physical, historical and social world.

For this reason his work is sometimes described as philosophical anthropology. Ricoeur is a post-structuralist hermeneutic philosopher who employs a model of textuality as the framework for his analysis of meaning, which extends across writing, speech, art and action.

Ricoeur considers human understanding to be cogent only to the extent that it implicitly deploys structures and strategies characteristic of textuality. It is Ricoeur's view that our self-understandings, and indeed history itselfare "fictive", that is, subject to the productive effects of the imagination through interpretation.

For Ricoeur, the human subjectivity is primarily linguistically designated and mediated by symbols. He states that the "problematic of existence" is given in language and must be worked out in language and discourse.

Ricoeur refers to his hermeneutic method as a "hermeneutics of suspicion" because discourse both reveals and conceals something about the nature of being. Unlike post-structuralists such as Foucault and Derrida, for whom subjectivity is nothing more than an effect of language, Ricoeur anchors subjectivity in the human body and the material world, of which language is a kind of second order articulation.

In the face of the fragmentation and alienation of post-modernity, Ricoeur offers his narrative theory as the path to a unified and meaningful life; indeed, to the good life. Style Ricoeur has developed a theoretical style that can best be described as "tensive".

He weaves together heterogeneous concepts and discourses to form a composite discourse in which new meanings are created without diminishing the specificity and difference of the constitutive terms.

Ricoeur's work on metaphor and on the human experience of time are perhaps the best examples of this method, although his entire philosophy is explicitly such a discourse. For example, in What Makes Us Think? Ricoeur discusses the nature of mental life in terms of the tension between our neurobiological conceptions of mind and our phenomenological concepts.

Similarly, in the essay "Explanation and Understanding" he discusses human behavior in terms of the tension between concepts of material causation, and the language of actions and motives. The tensive style is in keeping with what Ricoeur regards as basic, ontological tensions inherent in the peculiar being that is human existence, namely, the ambiguity of belonging to both the natural world and the world of action through freedom of the will.

Accordingly, Ricoeur insists that philosophy find a way to contain and express those tensions, and so his work ranges across diverse schools of philosophical thought, bringing together insights and analysis from both the Anglo-American and European traditions, as well as from literary studies, political science and history.

The tensions are played out in our ability to take different perspectives on ourselves and so to formulate diverse approaches and methods in understanding ourselves. The different theoretical frameworks employed in philosophy and the sciences are not simply the result of ignorance or power.

They are the result of tensions that run through the very structure of human being; tensions which Ricoeur describes as "fault lines. Ricoeur calls these "fault lines" because they are lines that can intersect in different ways in all the different aspects of human lives, giving lives different meanings.

However, as points of intersection of discourses, these meanings can come apart.

Self-reflections on Personal Aging Process | Accurate Essays

Ricoeur argues that the stability we enjoy with respect to the meanings of our lives is a tentative stability, subject to the influences of the material world, including the powers and afflictions of one's body, the actions of other people and institutions, and one's own emotional and cognitive states.

Given the fundamental nature of these tensions, Ricoeur argues that it is ultimately poetics exemplified in narrativerather than philosophy that provides the structures and synthetic strategies by which understanding and a coherent sense of self and life is possible.

Influences Ricoeur acknowledges his indebtedness to several key figures in the tradition, most notably, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel and Heidegger. Aristotelian teleology pervades Ricoeur's textual hermeneutics, and is most obvious in his adoption of a narrative approach.

The concepts of "muthos" and "mimesis" in Aristotle's Poetics form the basis for Ricoeur's account of narrative "emplotment," which he enjoins with the innovative powers of the Kantian productive imagination within a general theory of poetics.

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The influence of Hegel is manifest in Ricoeur's employment of a method he describes as a "refined dialectic. Like Hegel, the dialectic involves identifying key oppositional terms in a debate, and then proceeding to articulate their synthesis into a new, more developed concept.Writing a Literacy Narrative Narratives are stories, and we read and tell them for many different purposes.

Parents read their children bedtime stories as an evening ritual. Lay perceptions of “successful aging” are important for understanding this multifaceted construct and developing ways to assist older adults to age well.

The purpose of this qualitative study was to obtain older adults’ individual perspectives on what constitutes successful aging, along with. These essays are not intended to replace library research. They are here to show you what others think about a given subject, and to perhaps spark an interest or an idea in you.

To take one of these essays, copy it, and to pass Chaucer's Adherence to the "Three Estates" in the General Prologue. Aging: An Apprenticeship [Nan Narboe] on initiativeblog.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Nan Narboe's 56 thoughtfully selected essays offer an intimate and lyrical account of aging through the decades. Authors Judy Blume.

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A writer finds on some dusty shelf on the third-and-a-half floor of the Strand the sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird, a volume.

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